Drop her down 😰

Anibal

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Stupidly enough, I dropped my bike just now whilst reversing out of my garage. The doors were open and I was reversing when a gust of wind closed one of the doors. Without dismounting the bike I twisted my torso to push the left door open and I lost my balance and off she went to the right. Luckily the crash bar did its job and the below was the only damage suffered.
One thing, I could not lift her back up. I know I have a full tank of fuel but that should not have mattered much. I put the bike in first gear, twisted the handle bars full right and extended the side stand, positioned myself on the right of the bike with my bum back to the bike and tried to pull her up like the police do their Harley’s. No fecking way. In the end my neighbour was passing by and lent me a hand.
In 30 something years of riding motorcycles, I have never done this and got me worried if this were to happen again in a lonely place. I have doggy left knee but still, she is top heavy.
 

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You'll be amazed how much stronger you are when you stuff up in front of people..... especially attractive women.

Knowing my luck I'll probally drop mine in front of a crowd of uglies... fingers crossed they'll strong ones.
 
I used an alternative method that I saw a former NYPD HWY Wheel Lt. use on YT; I put my bike down on the left side, maneuvering it around clutter in my garage...

The technique basically has you crossing your arms to grab the lower handlebar grip for lifting and pushing on the upper grip; you're facing the bike and basically walk it upright...

I posted the YT video; I'll try to find it and post it for you - I'm 56 yrs old and 175 lbs at 5' 9", not a big guy by any measurements and found it to be an extremely easy method.

That will be my go to move, if I repeat stupid again, or find myself assisting another biker who has an unfortunate drop...

 
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Thank you guys.
Scott, that push and pull technique was unknown to me. I did not have much room around because my garage is basically a hole in the wall but I am impressed by that guy technique. I hope I never have to employ it tho. My heart stopped earlier on when I dropped her.
 
I feel you on that.. When I dropped mine, it was like slow motion as it was going down and nothing I could do to stop it. Unfortunately it was 0500 in the morning and only I was out to pick it up. No damage to the crash bars from the drop but the 4 or 5 attempts to pick it up scratched the crash bars. I know know the technique that Scott posted and holding off installing the new set of crash bars I have until after I practice a few of the guys techniques on tight u-turns :D Hopefully I will not have to practice the pick up technique also.
 
I broke all of my own rules, when I was moving my bike (First being, I wasn't even on the bike) and had the same slow motion effect...

Lucky it was more of a gentle placement down on an outdoor carpet, on its left side; which, allowed me to practice the more difficult move, without the kickstand being extended... So I had to be cautious of not lifting it too far over and dumping it onto the other side, and stabilizing the bike while I kick out the kickstand with my foot.

Like I said earlier, this technique is the new and best tool in my mental tool box; it worked well for me..
 
Stupidly enough, I dropped my bike just now whilst reversing out of my garage. The doors were open and I was reversing when a gust of wind closed one of the doors. Without dismounting the bike I twisted my torso to push the left door open and I lost my balance and off she went to the right. Luckily the crash bar did its job and the below was the only damage suffered.
One thing, I could not lift her back up. I know I have a full tank of fuel but that should not have mattered much. I put the bike in first gear, twisted the handle bars full right and extended the side stand, positioned myself on the right of the bike with my bum back to the bike and tried to pull her up like the police do their Harley’s. No fecking way. In the end my neighbour was passing by and lent me a hand.
In 30 something years of riding motorcycles, I have never done this and got me worried if this were to happen again in a lonely place. I have doggy left knee but still, she is top heavy.
It happens, and ALWAYS in the dumbest way. I ALMOST dropped my tricked out Harley at the gas station when the kickstand spring popped up the stand when I thought it was down. The bike was just about to drop but I foolishly refused to let it go and almost broke my leg....I did save it though. Don't worry about next time, you have crash bars, and no place is so lonely that no one ever comes by. People usually stop to help a downed biker, as much as they complain and even hate us because of the noise, surprisingly there are a LOT of ex. bikers out there too that will jump out of their cars to help.
But...pay extra attention when you stop et....that's what I do....and ...don't drop your beautiful bike!!!
 
I've rubbed both sides of my engine guard maneuvering around. Most recently was two days ago when I made u-turn out of my parking spot on the side of a residential road. I dunno if this ebay engine guard will completely save the bike if ever falls, but it's held up to some light scuffs.

Also, kinda related, does anyone know the part number for the peg feelers? Mine are almost gone and the peg's rubber is wearing away. Probably should replace them with a metal that makes better sparks...like titanium or something.
 

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